Last edited by Maran
Saturday, May 9, 2020 | History

9 edition of Disguise and recognition in the Odyssey found in the catalog.

Disguise and recognition in the Odyssey

by Sheila Murnaghan

  • 68 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published by Princeton University Press in Princeton .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Homer,
  • Epic poetry, Greek -- History and criticism,
  • Odysseus (Greek mythology) in literature,
  • Identity (Psychology) in literature,
  • Poetry -- Psychological aspects,
  • Recognition in literature,
  • Disguise in literature

  • Edition Notes

    StatementSheila Murnaghan.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPA4167 .M8 1987
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 197 p. ;
    Number of Pages197
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2374164M
    ISBN 100691067163
    LC Control Number87002296

    Disguise is so prevalent that its absence is used for dramatic effect, and the many forms it takes - physical alteration, emotional misdirection, or simply giving a false name Homer places the focus on two main relationships within the context of disguise: the disguise and . Book 19 in the Larger Context of the Odyssey," takes a structural analytical approach to reject early recognition between Penelope and Odysseus in Book 19 by arguing that the refusal of a variety.

    Analysis: Books 23–24 The scene in which Penelope tests her husband’s knowledge of the bed neatly brings together several ideas that the epic has touched on before. This subtle test reveals Penelope’s clever side—the side we have seen in her ploy to use a never-to-be-finished burial shroud to put off remarriage for four years. Works Cited and Consulted Heubeck, Alfred, J.B. Hainsworth, et al. A commentary on Homer's Odyssey. 3 Vols. Oxford Homer. The Odyssey. Trans. Robert Fitzgerald. New York: Vintage Books, Murnaghan, Sheila, Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey, Princeton UP Van der Valk, Marchinus. Textual Criticism of the Odyssey.

    Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches) By Sheila Murnaghan Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey reveals the significance of the Odyssey's plot, in particular the many scenes of recognition that make up the hero's homecoming and dramatize the cardinal values of Homeric society, an. Click to read more about Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey by Sheila Murnaghan. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for bookloversAuthor: Sheila Murnaghan.


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Disguise and recognition in the Odyssey by Sheila Murnaghan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Disguise and Recognition is a feminist classic as well as a superbly nuanced work of literary criticism. It broke entirely new ground within Classics and Feminist Studies by furnishing an answer to the conundrum of Penelope in the Odyssey, more than her husband's equal and yet tolerating a position subservient to him without by:   Disguise and Recognition is a feminist classic as well as a superbly nuanced work of literary criticism.

It broke entirely new ground within Classics and Feminist Studies by furnishing an answer to the conundrum of Penelope in the Odyssey, more than her husband’s equal and yet tolerating a position subservient to him without : Sheila Murnaghan.

Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey reveals the significance of the Odyssey 's plot, in particular the many scenes Disguise and recognition in the Odyssey book recognition that make up the hero's homecoming and dramatize the cardinal values of Homeric society, an aristocratic culture organized around recognition in the broader senses of honor, privilege, status, and fame.

Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey reveals the significance of the Odyssey's plot, in particular the many scenes of recognition that make up the hero's homecoming and dramatize the cardinal values of Homeric society, an aristocratic culture organized around recognition in the broader senses of honor, privilege, status, and fame/5(5).

Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey reveals the significance of the Odyssey's plot, in particular the many scenes of recognition that make up the hero's homecoming and dramatize the cardinal values of Homeric society, an aristocratic culture organized around recognition in the broader senses of honor, privilege, status, and fame.

This book is a comprehensive study of the Odyssey's plot, which shows how the motifs of disguise and recognition are used to articulate the central values of Homeric society.

The story of Odysseus' homecoming is discussed in relation to family dynamics, heroic competition, the social institutions of marriage and hospitality, gender relations, and the enduring power of : Sheila Murnaghan. The qualities of cunning, disguise, and self-restraint are closely related in The Odyssey – in some ways, they're sides of the same coin.

Odysseus is cunning, or clever, in many instances throughout his journey; one needs cleverness in order to survive in this ancient world of gods and monsters. The use of disguise in The Odyssey was helpful as it allowed Odysseus to survey his palace and identify those who had remained loyal and those who had not.

Emmaus was one of such great men who displayed loyalty to his king even in his long absence. Philosophy Nonfiction. Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey reveals the significance of the Odyssey 's plot, in particular the many scenes of recognition that make up the hero's homecoming and dramatize the cardinal values of Homeric society, an aristocratic culture organized around recognition in the broader senses of honor, privilege, status, and fame.

This book is a comprehensive study of the Odyssey's plot, which shows how the motifs of disguise and recognition are used to articulate the central values of Homeric society. The story of Odysseus' homecoming is discussed in relation to family dynamics, heroic competition, the social institutions of marriage and hospitality, gender relations Cited by: Disguise and recognition in the Odyssey.

[Sheila Murnaghan] -- "This book is a comprehensive study of the Odyssey's plot, which shows how the motifs of disguise and recognition are used to articulate the central values of Homeric society. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

The Disguised Guest: Rank, Role, and Identity, in the Odyssey [Douglas J. Stewart] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Disguised Guest: Rank, Role, and Identity, in the OdysseyAuthor: Douglas J.

Stewart. Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey reveals the significance of the Odyssey's plot, in particular the many scenes of recognition that make up the hero's homecoming and dramatize the cardinal values of Homeric society, an aristocratic culture organized around recognition in the broader senses of honor, privilege, status, and us' identity is seen to be rooted in his family Brand: Lexington Books.

Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey reveals the significance of the Odyssey's plot, in particular the many scenes of recognition that make up the hero's homecoming and dramatize the cardinal values of Homeric society, an aristocratic culture organized around recognition in the broader senses of honor, privilege, status, and : Sheila Murnaghan.

Uncommonly good collectible and rare books from uncommonly good booksellers. Find Disguise and Recognition In the Odyssey by Murnaghan, Sheila at Biblio. Uncommonly good collectible and rare books from uncommonly good booksellers.

COVID Update. Sheila Murnaghan: Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey. ix + Princeton University Press, £ - Volume 38 Issue 2 - R. Rutherford. Summary: Book When Telemachus reaches Eumaeus’s hut, he finds the swineherd talking with a stranger (Odysseus in disguise).

Eumaeus recounts Odysseus’s story and suggests that the stranger stay with Telemachus at the palace. But Telemachus is afraid of what the suitors might do to them. This book is a comprehensive study of the Odyssey's plot, which shows how the motifs of disguise and recognition are used to articulate the central values of Homeric story of Odysseus' homecoming is discussed in relation to family dynamics, heroic competition, the social institutions of marriage and hospitality, gender relations, and the enduring power of song.

Book 1 Book 2 Book 3 Book 4 Book 5 Book 6 Book 7 Book 8 Book 9 Book 10 Book 11 Book 12 Book 13 Book 14 Book 15 Book 16 Book 17 Book 18 Book 19 Book 20 Book 21 Book 22 Book 23 Book 24 Themes All Themes Fate, the Gods, and Free Will Piety, Customs, and Justice Cunning, Disguise, and Self-Restraint Memory and Grief Glory and Honor.

Use of Disguise in Homer’s Odyssey Words | 9 Pages. Use of Disguise in Homer’s Odyssey The difference between a wise and a foolish decision is often found in discerning when to conceal and when to reveal.

This discretion in concealing and revealing is a major theme within The Odyssey.Disguise and Recognition in the Odyssey reveals the significance of the Odyssey's plot, in particular the many scenes of recognition that make up the hero's homecoming and dramatize the cardinal values of Homeric society, an aristocratic culture organized around recognition in the broader senses of honor, privilege, status, and fame.

Odysseus' identity is seen to be rooted in his family.When Odysseus returns to Ithaca in Book 13 of The Odyssey, Athena disguises him as an old beggar, even going so far as to shrivel his skin, remove the "russet curls" () from his head, and dim the fire in his eyes.

Of course, Odysseus is no stranger to disguise.